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new-year-post

January 1, 2015 admin

New Year Old You?

Is change important?

Change is the only constant in the world. Seasons change, moods change, our bodies are not the same as they were yesterday and neither are the promises made by our political idols. The earth is transforming, planets shifting their atmospheric climate and satellites altering their paths. And yet we are the same? We still hold grudges, maintain resentment, dislike green leafy vegetables and abhor physical activity. We complain about bosses and teachers, gossip about friends behind their back and litter the roads of our beautiful cities. We plan great ‘New Year’ parties and yet we are the ‘same old’ people we were yesterday or three or five or ten years ago. We have scope to be better, to grow in mind, heart and and spirit; but we choose not to. We want to stay who we are. We don’t want to change (even for the better).

New year resolution

World over, New Year resolutions have gained prominence. A resolve to exercise, donate to charity, speak respectfully to parents or improve ones grades. And for many these fizzle out within a few days or weeks of the year. The impetus to change gets fed by enthusiasm from friends, family and colleagues at the time of making a resolution; but the momentum required to see it through is frequently lacking. What is the reason for obsession with making resolutions and sharing them with the world, tweeting them, and placing them as status updates on Facebook? Change matters when it is implemented. Actions speak louder than words. It’s quintessential to know the difference between the new resolve versus the new person we become owing to that resolve.

How many of these apply to you?

  • You feel you need to stop smoking
  • You are lagging behind at work
  • You are unable to make new friends
  • You can’t bring yourself to exercise
  • You worry about things all the time
  • You end up hurting people you love
  • You procrastinate and delay action
  • You hold back because you’re unsure
  • You don’t tell others how you feel

If even a single one applied to you, you know you need to change something. And who better than you knows that it is not going to be easy. The road to self-betterment is not an automated conveyor belt that can transport you without human effort. It is a long and winding path that requires endurance, willpower and fortitude. Identifying a problem is the first step towards its correction. Realizing and accepting shortcomings is the only way to developing an effective plan to overcome them…